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Definition of Travel at Dictionary.com

Origin of travel

1325–75; Middle English (north and Scots), orig. the same word as travail (by shift “to toil, labor” > “to make a laborious journey”)

usage note for travel

The word travel has come to exemplify a common spelling quandary: to double or not to double the final consonant of a verb before adding the ending that forms the past tense ( –ed ) or the ending that forms the present-participle ( –ing. ) We see it done both ways—sometimes with the same word ( travel, traveled, traveling; travel, travelled, travelling ). As readers, we accept these variations without even thinking about them. But as writers, we need to know just when we should double that final consonant and when we should not. Because American practice differs slightly from British practice, there is no one answer. But there are well-established conventions.
In American writing, when you have a one-syllable

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Definition of Tourism at Dictionary.com

[ too r-iz-uh m ]

/ ˈtʊər ɪz əm /


noun

the activity or practice of touring, especially for pleasure.
the business or industry of providing information, accommodations, transportation, and other services to tourists.
the promotion of tourist travel, especially for commercial purposes.

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Origin of tourism

First recorded in 1805–15; tour + -ism

Words nearby tourism

tourer, tourette syndrome, tourette’s syndrome, tourie, touring car, tourism, tourist, tourist car, tourist class, tourist court, tourist home

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for tourism

British Dictionary definitions for tourism

tourism


noun

tourist

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