WPS Garden of Lights will open for its 24th season at Green Bay Botanical Garden on Nov. 27 with 300,000-plus lights and new safety protocols

Green Bay Botanical Garden will flip the switch on the 24th annual WPS Garden of Lights on Nov. 27 with three new displays, two additional nights and a host of safety measures.

The popular holiday event, which typically draws 65,000 to 75,000 people and is the garden’s biggest fundraiser, has made changes this year to ensure a safe experience during the pandemic.

Visitors will still see more than 300,000 lights in nature-inspired displays throughout the garden, including favorites like the Icicle Forest and walk-through caterpillar, but they will encounter fewer people as they travel 1½ miles of paths by foot and horse-drawn wagon.

Capacity will be limited to 2,500 visitors across the four hours the event is open each night. Tickets will need to be purchased in advance for a specific day and time to limit the number of people in the garden at once and allow for social distancing. Visitors have 30 minutes to arrive from their selected entry time.

The display this year will include new attractions. A 60-foot oak tree in the Arendt Conifer Garden will rotate through the seasons. The Johnson Woodland Garden will be home to an illuminated winter wonderland. Visitors will also notice the addition of glistening lights on trees in several areas.

The walk-through caterpillar is a favorite with visitors to Garden of Lights. The structure, a popular stop for photos, gets moved to a different location at Green Bay Botanical Garden each year.

What else is different this year?

Parking: Unlike previous years, in which shuttles transported crowds from nearby Northeast Wisconsin Technical College parking lots, all parking will be on site or within walking distance. 

Horse-drawn wagon rides: Seating on the horse-drawn wagon rides will be limited to 10 guests per wagon and grouped by household.

Face coverings: Required for ages 2 and older on the wagons, in all garden buildings and outside when physical distancing isn’t possible.

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